Credit Report Articles

Couples Exchange Credit Scores, Reports This Valentine’s Day

About half of singles would not date someone with a credit score below 650.

Love is not blind - to poor credit scores, that is. The Baltimore Sun reported that unmarried couples are less bashful about discussing finances, with many exchanging credit history before tying the knot or moving in together.

This trend is linked to the recession, when a lost job or decreased wages could make partners more financially dependent on each other, while the $8,000 first-time homebuyer tax credit may inspire some to invest in property.

About half of singles would not date someone with a credit score below 650, according to a survey by FICO. One percent insists that a partner have a score between 800 and 850, with 850 being perfect, and the majority would wait a month to disclose their financial situation.

"Demanding to see another's credit history on the first or second date would scare off most," the report said. "But you definitely want to see a report and credit score months before buying a house or other major purchase together."

The score will indicate whether or not a partner is a risk to lenders, and give an overall impression of one's credit responsibility. The history can contain more relevant information, including bankruptcy, late payments and outstanding credit card balances.